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DESCRIPTION: Rooibos (red) tea may reduce stress levels by suppressing adrenal gland function. Nettle tea is mineral rich but may have estrogenic side effects. I’m sorry this video had to be cut at the last minute from the volume 12 Latest in Nutrition DVD (http://nutritionfacts.org/2013/01/07/new-nutrition-dvd-to-help-make-your-resolutions-more-resolutee-proceeds-to-charity/)—I ran out of room!

My go-to herbal tea is hibiscus. See the previous video, Herbal Tea Update: Hibiscus (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/herbal-tea-update-hibiscus/), and an earlier one, Better Than Green Tea? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/better-than-green-tea/) Mint would also be an excellent choice: Antioxidants in a Pinch (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/antioxidants-in-a-pinch/).

That micrograph of the nettle spicule made me think of the Migrating Fish Bones (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/migrating-fish-bones/) video—I think I’d take the nettles any day!

The fact that so much nutrition leaches into the water in nettle tea is a reason we don’t want to boil greens unless we’re making soup or something where we’re consuming the cooking water. See Best Cooking Method (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/best-cooking-method/) for more tips on preserving nutrients.

Have a question for Dr. Greger about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/herbal-tea-update-rooibos-nettle/ and he’ll try to answer it!

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20 replies
  1. shoopdeedoop
    shoopdeedoop says:

    Cooking does make certain foods such as those with vitamin C lose nutrition, but also gain digestibility of protein. It is simply about education, you don't cook fruit, but you do cook beans and meats!

    Reply
  2. gene978
    gene978 says:

    Have you seen the morons we're raising in this country lately? I've been trying to hire a simple server for my diner since New Years and its not simple anymore for the employee that come in these days with ZERO common sense. You have to tell them the same things over and over or they don't just won't move. When training starts with how to CLOSE the refridge, SHUT THE LIGHTS OFF at the end of day and USE HOT WATER when doing dishes you have to wonder.

    Reply
  3. NoCommentChick
    NoCommentChick says:

    P.s. when you say "These days…" you come off like an angry old man. You might as well be saying "You kids get off my lawn" If ANYONE needs a nice cup of rooibos tea (as I'm sure he'd love to serve me a large cup of STFU) it's gene978.

    Reply
  4. NoCommentChick
    NoCommentChick says:

    I think Dr. Greger addresses this issue in another video. Some foods loose more nutrition than others in the cooking process, but it also has the side effect of making the nutrition still in the food more assimilable. Also you can minimize nutrient loss through methods such as steaming and boiling. All in all I think he said having some raw food in the diet is good but that the argument that raw food was more nutrient dense didn't always pan out, so eat both.

    Reply
  5. gene978
    gene978 says:

    On the contrary just the opposite! You're wrong on every count. To bad, no intelligence from the Bitch gallery. My guests are always amazed how long my help stays. Today's help is not help. Sry to say they're BRAIN DEAD!

    Reply
  6. Melanie St. Ours
    Melanie St. Ours says:

    Thank you for all of your excellent work, Dr Greger! I'm a clinical herbalist and I'd like to share some information about how stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is used in clinical practice. Trained herbalists wouldn't recommend the dose mentioned here. We use standard infusions made with 1oz dried herb and 1 quart of water infused for at least four hours. That standard brew has much, much, more nutritional value than the preparation mentioned here. As you know, dosing is crucial!

    Reply
  7. JB 6000
    JB 6000 says:

    There is some suspicion about herbal teas although that is because in the store lots of them are actually not very good ones. Many conventional tisanes on the market for one thing have artificial flavorings and sometimes even top calories. If one sticks to a plain good herbal tea which tastes all right thats the thing to do unless you are using it only purely for medicinal reason

    Reply
  8. Neophyte
    Neophyte says:

    If you're anything like me and drink tea by the bucketload with multiple re-used bags hanging in the cup (OK, OK yeah I have a problem, sheesh), those mineral traces add up to significance quite fast.

    Reply
  9. Adventure in Pachmarhi
    Adventure in Pachmarhi says:

    Hi, I was watching your nice video on YouTube, and I wanted to know if it's possible to make a deal with you?
    I have a product I want to promote and I willing to pay $30 per week to have my list posted in the description of your YouTube video at the top? please let me know if this is something you would like to make a deal on?
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    Ram

    Reply

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