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DESCRIPTION: The cardiovascular benefits of plant-based diets may be severely undermined by vitamin B12 deficiency.

Make sure you see the “prequel” to this video: Arteries of Vegans vs. Runners (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/arteries-of-vegans-vs-runners).

I have dozens of videos on B12 (http://nutritionfacts.org/?s=b12). For a quick cut-to-the-chase see my Q&A What is the best way to get vitamin B12? (http://nutritionfacts.org/questions/what-is-the-best-way-to-get-b12/) and for some context Vegan B12 deficiency: putting it into perspective (http://nutritionfacts.org/2011/08/25/vegan-b12-deficiency-putting-it-into-perspective/). Vitamin B12 supplementation with fortified foods or supplements is critical critical critical on a plant-based diet.

Have a question for Dr. Greger about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/vitamin-b12-necessary-for-arterial-health/ and he’ll try to answer it!

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36 replies
  1. dabigisland1
    dabigisland1 says:

    I started taking B12 six months ago and felt mentally more alert but made several other dietary changes at the same time so I cannot be sure it was the B12 causing the positive effect

    Reply
  2. Mark Smiley
    Mark Smiley says:

    Have there been any studies regarding delaying or reversing aortic stenosis. I am 64 years old and have been diagnosed with moderate stenosis and it seems surgery is the only solution

    Reply
  3. JCHangtime
    JCHangtime says:

    If your a vegan then just take B12 supplements you need & be done with it. Then tell the meat promoters meat is not the ONLY way to get B12. You can get somewhere by riding a horse or by being dragged by a horse. You can get B12 by supplements or by who knows how many pounds or years of unnecessarily eating something that can harm you to get B12.

    Reply
  4. durianrider
    durianrider says:

    I took b12 as a meat eater and I take it as a vegan. I train with many tour de france riders in Jan since 2003. Every single rider I have asked 'do you take b12 injections' they have all answered along the lines of 'yes of course, that is standard practice in any pro sport…'

    Good book to read is 'could it be b12?' by Sally Pacholok. She hates vegans but admits that eating meat for b12 sufficiency is 'extremely dangerous'.

    Reply
  5. Carole McDonnell
    Carole McDonnell says:

    Love all your videos but these studies seem to be about post-menopausal women…so i was waiting to hear about how that fits into the mix. The video seems to take what is about a group of women and generalize it. Just asking.

    Reply
  6. BozalliCopter
    BozalliCopter says:

    To those saying A) Dr Greger is bashing Veganism, or   B) Dr Greger doesn't think Veganism is healthy………..   Dr Greger IS a Vegan. He's a pretty clued up guy on nutrition, and he obviously believes Veganism to be the best. He's just pointing B12 out as one thing to watch out for.

    Reply
  7. ultrademon
    ultrademon says:

    Just to be clear, B12 is a product of bacteria. High amounts of leafy greens will provide ample B12. Supplementation is just a more convenient option, since most people don't have a steady supply of quality greens, or the time to eat greens all day long. I just like to think about those big strong Gorillas in the wild eating a diet that consists of 80% leafy greens… no B12 deficiencies there… of course they probably eat termites and other insects (intentionally or otherwise) which are extremely high in B12.

    Reply
  8. onyomi
    onyomi says:

    If eating a particular diet requires artificial supplements, then doesn't that indicate it isn't natural? I don't like to take any supplements if I can avoid it. Might it not be better to be a "mostly vegan" and eat a big serving of oysters for B12 and zinc once a week? Can animal products once a week meet our B12 needs for the rest of the time?

    Reply
  9. SeabasR
    SeabasR says:

    Doesn't B-12 come from bacteria? Are there any other organisms that derive B-12 from other sources? I've read that this B-12 producing bacteria can be found on some organically grown plant foods, especially ones grown close to the ground such as carrots or lettuce, and with the modern way of growing crop the bacteria cannot live on conventionally grown foods. What's your opinion on this?

    Reply
  10. Kiyoshi Yan
    Kiyoshi Yan says:

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    Reply
  11. Jessica Duncan
    Jessica Duncan says:

    Dr. Greger my name is Sherrick Duncan I am a husband and a father of four.

    I worked hard and saved up and made payment for years and now own two acres in Oklahoma and am starting to grow my own food so that I can get off of food stamps and section8 welfare.

    I did all this so we can afford to eat a mostly plant based diet (I would do all plant based but it conflicts with my 100% self sufficiency self reliance prepper goals) so I have a question.

    If I eat like 98% plant based but only eat as much animal products as absolutely necessary to get a self sufficienct b12 source off of eithet eggs or whatever the best animal product b12 source is how much and how often maximum/minimum would one person need to ingest of animal product a week, month, year to get there necessary b12?

    I am absolutely 100% unwilling to do b12 injections or sublingual drops or foods or drinks that are fortified because (UNLESS I can grow or produce the b12 supplements myself) which from my studies I cant, then it violates my self sufficiency goal.

    So my question is what is the maximum/minimum amount of whatever the animal product highest in b12 would I need to eat how much and how often only to get my b12 needs from our farm raised animals?

    In other words I want to know how much of and what animal product that i can produce myself to eat to get all my b12 but little enough of this animal product to get the absolute minimum to no damage to my body or health?

    Reply
  12. Jessica Duncan
    Jessica Duncan says:

    Dr. Greger my name is Sherrick Duncan I am a husband and a father of four.

    I worked hard and saved up and made payment for years and now own two acres in Oklahoma and am starting to grow my own food so that I can get off of food stamps and section8 welfare.

    I did all this so we can afford to eat a mostly plant based diet (I would do all plant based but it conflicts with my 100% self sufficiency self reliance prepper goals) so I have a question.

    If I eat like 98% plant based but only eat as much animal products as absolutely necessary to get a self sufficienct b12 source off of eithet eggs or whatever the best animal product b12 source is how much and how often maximum/minimum would one person need to ingest of animal product a week, month, year to get there necessary b12?

    I am absolutely 100% unwilling to do b12 injections or sublingual drops or foods or drinks that are fortified because (UNLESS I can grow or produce the b12 supplements myself) which from my studies I cant, then it violates my self sufficiency goal.

    So my question is what is the maximum/minimum amount of whatever the animal product highest in b12 would I need to eat how much and how often only to get my b12 needs from our farm raised animals?

    In other words I want to know how much of and what animal product that i can produce myself to eat to get all my b12 but little enough of this animal product to get the absolute minimum to no damage to my body or health?

    Reply
  13. T Lauren Chadwell
    T Lauren Chadwell says:

    I've obtained a vegan diet for several months, take vegan vitamin supplement, exercise six days a week, drink plenty of water and green tea. However, I have an increase of spider veins in my legs and one vercrose vein in the back of my right leg. Every time, not just often, but every time I stand up I feel light headed. Also, I feel tired and fatigued.(Im not over weight either)What can I do to improve my blood circulation? Thank you!

    Reply

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